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Talk about girls's education

Many young girls usually end up failing the school term and exams because they miss roughly five to seven days of school each month. Some schools exclude other girls because they fail to meet minimum attendance requirements.

GIRL EDUCATION

Since the dawn of time till when Africa embraced civilization that brought education, African women have been given fewer regards. Many African ideologies back then undermined the place of an educated African Woman, according to them; the place of the woman was in the kitchen and taking care of domestic chores. But as time evolved, and Africa evolved too, many now saw the need to campaign for girls’ education and the phenomenon became unavoidable.

There is a common phrase which holds that ‘’when you educate a woman, you educate a nation’’. This assertion or phrase is yet to be fully implemented in the African context as gild-Child education has not yet been given its place. Notwithstanding, knowing the place or the role of an African woman in nation building, has pushed African governments into advocating for girl-child education.

WHY A GIRL CHILD SHOULD BE EDUCATED

In Africa, women constitute the highest percentage of the informal sector, which represents about 70% of markets in the developing world. Proponents of female education have argued that with better education of the girl child or women, this class of people will have more knowledge on how to expand their businesses, thus boosting the economy and promote the economic advancement of the continent as well as add to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the country. In another development, educating a girl child will be a remedy or solution to some social vices among girls and young women in the contemporary world.

Many young girls usually end up failing the school term and exams because they miss roughly five to seven days of school each month. Some schools exclude other girls because they fail to meet minimum attendance requirements.

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